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over the next two years, all of our 66,000 u.s. troops currently in afghanistan -- we are leaving that country. for afghanistan that means there is going to be some significant shortfalls in combat capability. they are relying on the united states for all kinds of things. not only up until recently for being the primary fighting mechanism for the afghans, but also from a logistical standpoint and from an intelligence standpoint, we provide the bulk of support. that also includes air lifting for their troops to get a point of conflict where they need to engage with the enemy. host: as far as picking up after we leave? caller: they are not completely prepared. they have the afghan national come -- the afghan national police that is getting pretty good at their primary task of going after caliban cells. the other problem of this is an uneven prepared this. there are significant problems with training the afghan army. there are significant problems with training the afghan police. there is going to be some significant drawbacks to the drawdown announced by the president. host: "the ne
atannable nor desirable. host: one of the headlines this morning, january jobs again in u.s., or jobs gained rather in the u.s., 157,000. we go to pete in lakeland, florida on our line for democrats. you're on the "washington journal." caller: hey, top of the morning to you gentlemen. i know you touched a little bit on downsizing. i mean the microsoft, excel format, making everybody a number for efficiency in the efficiency experts. but man, i think capitalisms on the way to die in the united states. you got companies right now that, if you want your high tech workers and you want a submarine, the college students and the current working class in america, you go to india and you bring them over on visas. you want to crush the white collar workers, i mean unions as far as industrial are pretty much dead. you move your plants to china and mexico. host: patrick rice, your response to what he had to say. guest: if he's arguing we're on the brink of a social revolution, it would seem to me that, i can't see in the future and i don't want to say he's wrong, but we've been endured tougher economic
to people from silicon valley, from start-ups that have tried to hire here in the u.s., but could not find the talent. they found the talent in belarus and cannot bring the workers here because they cannot get the visas. they have workers that are working in belarus that they would like to bring here, but they cannot. host: we have one more student ready to talk to megan hughes. jerilyn joran does now. -- caroline joins us now. >> what is the impact you expect from gun legislation, given the fact that there are a large number of assault style weapons grandfather being. guest: i leave your speaking as a bit about the assault weapons ban, correct? >> correct. guest: the 1994 assault weapons ban, there were many questions about its web -- its effectiveness. senator dianne feinstein work on this in 1994. she is the main push, the maine senator pushing this today. -- the main senator pushing this today. the real question is whether it stands a chance. you have heard the president speaking about assault weapons bans as the booklet. you want -- specifically. he wants to see a boat propeller -- a
the u.s. congress, both of the house and the senate, needs to do is to repeal the national war powers act, which was never repealed after world war ii. this is what has given the president the power of executive power. the gentleman from missouri, i am with you that the repeal of the 17th amendment needs to be done. also, your caller from new hampshire, he was right on with the 10th amendment. executive orders by the president are a president's hope, a president's win and a desire. it really is not law unless it is backed by the courts. again, other people have mentioned that the courts have told the president that he needs to remove these people from that board. those were illegal appointments. he yet flaunts the supreme court. where do we stop with the executive orders? host: on the news makers this week, harold rogers is our guest. he talks about the sequester and what congress is not reaching an agreement on spending cuts. let's take a listen to him talk about whether the sequestered as any flexibility. is there any way they can decide how the cuts are put into place. [video clip]
by a u.s. president. he spoke about gun laws, new spending on education, increasing the minimum wage, creating new private-sector- public partnerships. there was a response from marco rubio and another from rand paul. we will get your reaction to all of this. 202-585-3882 for all others. reach us on twitter or facebook, or send us an e-mail. let's go through the headlines in the national papers this morning. pierce "usa toda -- here is "usa today" -- and then here is the "washington times" -- and the new york times -- the wall street journal -- the washington post -- we are getting your reaction this morning on the washington journal for the first hour. what did you think of the speech, the proposals, and the republican response as well? later on, a line of lawmakers for their reaction and to take your comments. our first phone call is joe in georgia, republican. caller: thank you. i love c-span, greta. it was the same old obama with more taxes and more government. marco rubio is incredible. the key to our future is electing more people like him and tom graves and doug collins and to
of the u.s. capitol the sunday. the nation's governors continue their winter meeting on sunday. congress returns tomorrow with the senate. chuck hagel is expected to be the next defense secretary. a boat could happen early as tuesday. and those automatic budget cuts -- budget cuts begin to kick in. on the sunday, often during, 24, we will begin with the topic of health care. specifically, medicaid. is it a good idea? we want to get your thoughts on all of this. 202 is the area code. 585-3881 for the republicans. 202-585-3880 is our democratic line. you can also join us at facebook or send us an e-mail. a couple of issues dealing with health care and the elderly. a cover story, "increased -- a crisis in plain sight." and this cover story from time magazine called, "why medical billsa re killing us." and from "the new york times," -- there is the story of one of a number of republican governors -- he said ohio would reverse this decision if the government failed to cover all the cost of the expansion. here are some details for ohio -- last year the supreme court ruling that they have the a
," this morning headlines -- "u.s. memo on killing citizens in al qaeda." host: the story is in "the new york times." nbc news, reporting on that as well. front page of "the wall street journal," the u.s. is going to suit standard and poor's on ratings. host: that is the front page of "the wall street journal," and many of the newspapers this morning. on the senate side, "the boston globe," "the gop is finding few takers for the john kerry see. the party is not deterred -- seat. the party is not deterred." oncehis one, "senator's secret daughter dies at 87." host: that is the front page this morning of "the state newspaper." we will go to sarah in clark summit, independent caller. we are talking about president obama saying that universal background checks have the support of the majority. what do you think about this? what else do you think should be done? caller: first i have a question. i am a gun owner. hopefully i will never have to use it for anything that anyone else would have to use it for, but i do like the protection on our small farm. and we do shoot. we have taught our grandkids,
, for every 12, 2013. president obama traveled -- will travel down pennsylvania avenue tonight to the u.s. capitol building to deliver the first state of the union address of his second term at 9:00 eastern. c-span coverage begins at 8:00 tonight. we would like to hear from you this morning. how much reducing state of the union addresses matter? here are the numbers to call -- be it can also find us online. john the conversation -- -- join the conversation. the front page of "politico's website -- we will talk about lobbying later on this morning. first, let's look at the five stings it says to watch the president obama address tonight. , do you think state of the union addresses matter? that's our question for you. on facebook we have a poll where you can weigh in. the washington post says the impact of annual addresses does not intend to be long-lasting. what do you stinkpot? jim in therapy -- what do you think? jim in fairfax station. caller: no, they don't matter. it's an opportunity to look at what is said in a state of the union and move forward a year after it and assess what was p
, 2.6 million pistols were sold in the u.s., 2.3 million rifles. 862,000 shotguns. 573,000 revolvers. larry pratt is our guest, executive director of gun owners of america. the national rifle association was also invited to participate in this program and they have declined. blue ridge arsenal is our base this morning in chantilly, virginia for the next couple of hours. we will be talking with employees and looking at some of the products and services the blue ridge arsenal gunshot and range provides as we take calls with our guest larry pratt. dave is in michigan. caller: hello, my message in reaction to many things is i really have not heard anything as far as what has been brought forth yeah -- why do we not see when a gun is purchase, whether it is a straw purchase, whether it is dealer, why do we not see -- why have we not all heard about a gun lock be issued by a federal base or by some needs of stamping a gun lock with the serial number with that particular gun, that coordinates with that gun? i have seen in alaska, opening up the trunk of a person's vehicle, if there is a gun
of america put out a piece, talking about the u.s. celebrating president's day. it first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the february 22nd birthday of george washington, the first u.s. president. joe in maryland, democrat, hi. caller: my favorit would have to have been bill clinton. there are so many to choose from. i was very young. it was in high school at the time. he put into place a lot of laws that allow for people like me to go to college. beyond that, he was just incredibly involved in science necessarily see a lot of a a lot of presidents do now. host: from oklahoma, an independent caller. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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